Toby Arrives Launching Koch Marshall Trio

Toby Arrives Launching Koch Marshal Trio

Toby Arrives Launching Koch Marshall Trio

Gregg Koch, uber guitarist, self-titled ‘ King Of Gristle’, practicer of necromantic six-string sorcery, certainly knows a thing or two about a thing or two. So, it was with some trepidation after finally agreeing to his son ( and drummer ) Dylan’s relentless requests, that they booked a studio to jam with Hammond B3 maestro Toby Marshall.

You can feel the utter joyorific amazement on ‘Toby Arrives’, the first song, that also gave the album its title. Those very first never-played-together-before notes are captured here for us lucky people to witness this universal alignment of talent extraordinaire. The resultant shuffle in G allows the listener that rare view of musicians ‘feeling each other out’, creating sparks and trading energies. The sense that the three smiles on those faces grew wider as the song progresses is impossible to ignore. Interplay, chemistry, call it what you will, but yes, Toby certainly has ‘arrived’.

The first signing to Mascot Label Group’s new ‘Players Club’, Koch Marshall Trio present ‘Toby Arrives’ in an organ trio format, with Toby Marshall’s Hammond bass pedals filling out any lack of low end. Second song ‘Funk Meat’ is a one-chord funk feel jam, with straight drums and a cool groove. Gregg’s biting Telecaster howls, moans, snarls and squeaks but always plays for the song. When you have a trick bag as full as Gregg’s it’s easy to show off but on ‘Funk Meat’ and throughout Gregg and Toby showcase but not clutter. It’s Toby and the roaring Hammond B3 that provide the biggest lifts, you can hear Dylan react to the energy with great dynamism.

Production throughout is bold, nice big and full bass, live recorded ( mostly ) in the studio. Dylan Koch’s drums could be higher in the mix for my taste. They tend to get a little lost here and there. He plays more of an accompanist role and it’s a shame he isn’t given just one chance to show his obvious chops. You can hear the youth but the groove is strong with Koch Jr, and he’s got a bright future ahead.

The lead song from the album, ‘ Heed The Boogaloo’ is a quirky, catchy, can’t get it out of your head number, with a classic familiar pounding bass line. The head is nodding once more, with great groove drumming on the beat. Gregg’s motif guitar part is full of his trademark sass, swagger and humour. Again he takes the first solo, country chicken-pickin’ meets Robben Ford, propelling the tune along, with lovely ‘outside’ notes that tease the ear. Toby sticks to more conventional pentatonics, but the energetic roaring Hammond lifts again raise Dylan, resulting in Gregg’s bar raised even further with another world-class lead break.

Stand out track for me is the 9 plus minutes of ‘Mysterioso’, where at last Dylan gets a showcase and takes us away from the bluesy and into Jeff Beck territory, with a great groove. Another flavour from Gregg with a spacey delay, coupled with an almost psychedelic Hammond. This song needs an oil light show, a get stoned on the music prog rock delight. Gregg also shows us what an influence Derek Trucks is on the guitar world with some of his trademark slide licks, trippy, trance-like and triumphant at the climax.

‘Toby Arrives’ is the sort of album you could stack alongside a Thelonius Monk record, a Jeff Beck record or a Mike Landau record. If you went for one of the other three and got this by mistake your day wouldn’t be ruined. Throw in Albert Collins and Albert Lee and you get the picture. The last track ‘Sin Repent Repeat’ is a sign of things to come. This initial meeting and resultant jams could progress to present more composition such as on this number, with an overdubbed acoustic and at last a louder drum mix flowing in a slide led groove that rounds things up perfectly.

As a live concert momento, and a capture the moment jam ‘Toby Arrives’ works perfectly. Whether you’ll still be listening in a week, month or year I’m not sure. Musicians will steal licks and talk tones, but all will look forward with eagerness to the follow-up, ‘Toby Has Been Here A While Now Let’s Get Down To Business’.

Pendragon for Bluesdoodles gives Koch Marshall Trio ‘Toby Arrives’ a jamtastic

EIGHTpawprint half inchdoodle paws out of TEN …

Out via Mascot Label Group 23rd February 2018

Track Listing:

      1. Toby Arrives
      2. Funk Meat
      3. Heed The Boogaloo
      4. Let’s Get Sinister
      5. Mysterioso
      6. Enter The Rats
      7. Boogie Yourself Drade
      8. Sin repent Repeat

    Toby Arrives Launching Koch Marshal Trio

Tommy Emmanuel Joined By Superb Artists on Accomplice One

Tommy Emmanuel Joined By Superb Artists on Accomplice One

Tommy Emmanuel Joined By Superb Artists on Accomplice One

A full two years in the making, the brand new album Accomplice One from Australian guitar master Tommy Emmanuel finally lands on Bluesdoodle’s desk. Oh boy, it was sure worth the wait. This time around Tommy has opted to share centre stage with some heavyweight company – all 16 tracks of the album have guest artists featured.
Now it takes a great talent to complement a great talent, and with names such as Mark Knopfler, Ricky Skaggs and Jason Isbell joining Tommy, what we have here is a veritable aural feast.

Things kick off in style and the album mood is set perfectly with ‘Deep River Blues’. Four-time Grammy winner Jason Isbell joins Tommy on an exquisite Blind Lemon Jeffersonesque journey through a riverside blues lament. Exemplary vocals from both. Production is exactly as it should be, the twang of the strings could ruffle your hair and with each singers breath, it could be pulled back in place. Raw, but not ragged, slick when it needs to be, in the room and magnificent.

Ricky Skaggs appears next up, bringing his country storytelling to ‘Song And Dance Man’; surely an autobiographical cut from Tommy; a chronicle of a life lived on the road, town to town, striving for the next show.

Jefferson Airplane guitar legend Jorma Kaukonen and Nashville session harmonica king Pat Bergeson are next up on ‘Saturday Night Shuffle’. “You’re a bad ass cat man!” says Tommy on the intro, acknowledging the skills of both to come. This trio of talent certainly had a ball recording this track, as the shouts of appreciation and mutual respect bounce back and forth.

Up and coming blues/rock psychedelic J D Simo brings his lightning Don Kelley Band Telecaster back out for the first appearance of an electric guitar thus far on ‘Wheelin’ & Dealin”. Emmanuel’s Django acoustic sets the tone but firebrand JD has a few tricks of his own too. Fretboard fireworks to compliment, then up steps Clarksville born banjo legend Charlie Cushman with a searing last solo. Definitely one for the pickers and grinners out there.

What is clear and apparent throughout is that with all of the tremendous talents on show there is never ego, overshadow or dominance. Every track is born from mutual respect and healthy competition.

A cover of ‘Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay’ can be hard to do convincingly but Emmanuel, again joined by JD Simo present a reggae-tinged feel which doesn’t make you long for Otis, but rather sway from side to side in admiration.

The surprise standout track for this reviewer is a cover of Madonna’s early hit ‘Borderline’. The delicate country vocal and sublime violin of Amanda Shires expose this 80s dance track as the great song it really was all along. The 6/8 waltz time improves the original composition, it is truly magical.

A Mark Knopfler song and duet – ‘ You Don’t Want To Get You One Of Those’ is a tale of a favourite rust bucket money pit auto we’ve all had and loved. And miss. Delivered in typical Knopfler fashion, it’s so great to hear Tommy and Mark together on record.

There aren’t many good covers of ‘Purple Haze’ out there. Resonator magician Jerry Douglas assists Tommy in just about making it work, although this version resembles Yardbirds breakout hit ‘For Your Love’ a little rather than the Hendrix anthem.

Tommy’s love of gypsy jazz is always apparent, and what better way to take us to the Hot Club Du France than with virtuoso duo Frank Vignola and Vinny Raniolo, accompanying on ‘Djangology’, a delightful stroll down the Rue De Rivoli on a warm summers evening.

Suzy Bogguss duets with Tommy’s as always astounding acoustic on the beautiful album finale ‘The Duke’s Message’, a soft and gentle closing before the inevitable ‘play the whole album again’ urge kicks in.

16 tracks of majestic musicianship might get tedious for non-musicians, but interspersed between the jamming and fine fretwork are some gems of heartfelt beauty that any fan will appreciate. Guitarists, of course, will marvel but Accomplice One has enough taste to match the tones, enough subtlety to match the shenanigans and enough dynamic interludes to match the dynamite.

A wonderful piece of work from a fine musician.

Pendragon for Bluesdoodles gives Accomplice One a masterly

NINEpawprint half inchdoodle paws out of TEN …

 

Track Listing:

    1. Deep River Blues
    2. Song And Dance Man
    3. Saturday Night Shuffle
    4. Wheelin’ & Dealin’
    5. C-Jam Blues
    6. (Sittin’ On) The Dock Of The Bay
    7. Borderline
    8. You Don’t Want To Get You One Of Those
    9. Keepin’ It Reel
    10. Looking Forward To The Past
    11. Purple Haze
    12. Rachel’s Lullaby
    13. Djangology
    14. Watson Blues
    15. Tittle Tattle
    16. The Duke’s Message

Tommy Emmanuel –  Accomplice One – Mascot Label Group

Tommy Emmanuel Joined By Superb Artists on Accomplice One

In Conversation Tommy Emmanuel with help from his friends

In Conversation Tommy Emmanuel with help from his friendsAustralian born Grammy award-winning Tommy Emmanuel has been wowing audiences and guitar players across the globe for some time now. His unique playing style, pure musicality and to quote Chet Atkins, his “fearless fingerpicking”…surely Tommy needs very little introduction. His new album “Accomplice One” is a veritable delight of 16 tracks of duets with a wide range of musician friends of Tommy’s who were all keen to lend a pair of hands or a voice…

 

“Accomplice One” is brimming with talent, what was the idea behind getting all of these great players together?

It’s really come about from living and working in Nashville over the last 15 years which has grown a group of artists and friends who I get to work with from time to time on various things. I got the idea that I wanted to collaborate with some really good artists, good singers, good songwriters to see what we could come up with. It was over 2 years of trying to find time between my touring and everyone else’s touring and projects for it to all come together. It was great in the way that everyone had suggestions of songs and it really came together quite beautifully. With all the schedules involved it was my recording and mixing engineer that really glued everything together what with me being in and out-of-town all the time, we’d book the studio ahead of time and he’d be ready to go as soon as I and the other artists were in and we wasted no time at all as time is precious for everyone. The tracks were cut with just the acoustic guitars and vocals and we would add bass, drums afterwards. It gives a warm and live sound for sure. Each of the artists recorded more that what’s on the album, like Amanda Shires who I duet with on Madonna’s “Borderline” did a swing track that’s not on the album, I have other tracks as well and we chose the best tracks for the first album. That’s why it’s called “Accomplice One” as there’ll be another one.

JD Simo, Amanda Shires, Ricky Skaggs are some of the artists you duet with – why did you pick these artists?

The fact that these are young people coming up in the business and really talented artists who are all really soulful. I thought that rather than trying to get Keith Urban or another well-established artist in that younger people, new and fresh could bring something else to the album and be a great opportunity in their stage of their career for us to be seen working together. Then again, Mark Knopfler, who I’ve know since 1984, certainly doesn’t need any help from me but that fact that he wrote back to me and said: “Sure, I’d love to play on your record, but can we do one of my songs?” – you know, I just couldn’t deny him that as I love everything he writes. Mark invited me over to his studio in Chiswick London, we sat down and went forth and back with who was going to sing which line and play what part. From the moment I arrived in his studio, it took an hour and a half to arrange, record and Mark’s keyboard player/assistant mixed and mastered the song and I was out of there with it that quick.

Having produced the album yourself, what were you looking for sound wise?

First of all, I didn’t want it to have anything on it that was unnecessary, more stripped back, lush, warm and earthy. The only track that has keyboards on it is “The Duke’s Message” the very last track which I cut with Suzy Bogguss and one of my original songs. I had Grammy award-winning piano player Will Barrow come in, listen to the song and just play along with what was going on already instead of embellishing parts. The rest of the album is really just guitar, bass and drums, sometimes no drums. Where there are bass parts they’re well thought out and I played some of those, I even played the drums on it – no programmed nonsense here mate! On “Saturday Night Shuffle” I purposely mic’d the drums at a distance and made them sound almost like they were in a garage. All the acoustic guitars are mic’d up just how you would playing live so I really took an approach to producing the album in the most organic way as possible.

Alongside your original tracks, there are a few covers, what’s behind the choice of those?

Trying to find the right song for a person, you know that’s the key. Mark and I could have done anything but doing an original that’s something different is always great. With Mark’s song we really approached it like Tom Waits meets Randy Newman! JD Simo is such a great guy and we have a shared love for Elvis Presley but cut Otis Redding’s “(Sitting On) The Dock of The Bay” where you can really hear the fun we had playing it. There’s a contrast in going from “Keep It Real” with it’s Celtic feel into “Rachel’s Lullaby”. Clive Carroll and I have been friends for a long time (he’s one of my favourite musicians on the planet) and we worked up that medley of “Keep It Real” together. There’s a lot to it already but it could of easily have gone on for another 10 minutes as you know how it is when you get a good thing going playing! You mentioned the “Purple Haze” cover, I hate to tell you and most people will not believe it, that was one take. Jerry Douglas, the dobro playing wizard, came in to play on another track and we got that finished so I said to him “Do you want to have a shot at Purple Haze?”. Jerry’s response could not have been more emphatic; “What a great idea! That’ll really piss off all the bluegrass purists! Let’s do it!”. I brought my guitar into the control room, showed him how I played it, Jerry’s like “Just nod at me when you want me to play…” and away we went with it in the purest moment of inspiration and improvisation.

On the note of improvisation and for the guitarists out there, what advice/approach can you pass on?

Well there’s a certain amount of not being afraid to step out and try stuff. You know, everybody worries too much about what people will think of them if they fly their kite to high, you know what I mean? I really try to get rid of that as it will only hold you back and to just play what I feel like playing in the moment and this is what my instincts are telling me to play. You’ve gotta have fun with it but at the same time have something to say musically that works, makes sense to you and let it fly. There’s a time to really jump in and a time to hold it back, listen and find the right spot to come in – you know Jerry is just like that, no boundaries, no filters and just runs at things dead ahead. Jerry and I have some shows coming up together in 2018 in addition to the shows JD Simo and I are doing together and you can bet on us improvising in the moment on those. At the base of it, it’s about being in the moment and really listening as that’s the first thing a real/good musician does.

In the Spring you’re running a guitar camp in Scotland, planning to give away your guitar secrets?

Oh definitely as that’s what teaching is all about, you have to give the student everything. That’s happening in May 2018 and it’s 4 days of lessons, masterclasses, evening concerts and there’s also time for one-on-ones with students at the camp with myself and the other instructors. It’s one of those where we want people to come along, be challenged in their playing and change the way they experience playing and learning music. It’s a whole different ball game and I really think that the people who are going to be on that camp with me are going to have the best time. It’s really about immersing yourself and seeing things in a different way.

More information and booking for Tommy’s Guitar Camp in Scotland can be found HERE

If you could go travel back in time, what would you tell the Tommy Emmanuel in his early 20’s?

Don’t be so worried about what people think, have a great time and just try to learn as much as you can.

Accomplice One is due for release January 19 on the new label Players Club via Mascot Label Group and can be ordered here  MASCOT LABEL GROUP

 

In Conversation Tommy Emmanuel with help from his friends