CD Review: Fish ~ A Feast Of Consequences

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Fish
Feast Of Consequences
Chocolate Frog Record Company

 

This album was released September 2013, and was a welcomed album after a six-year gap since his previous album 13th Star.

Feast of Consequences has a quintet of songs at the heart of the album, High Wood; Crucifix Corner; The Gathering; Thistle Alley and The Leaving focusing on the World War One. These five songs span the generations from 1914 through to today, a sharing of history, they stir a collective memory of stories from Great & Grandparents, how many of us wish we had listened more closely to personal sorrow of the destruction of war. As you would expect the collection of songs are a liturgy of emotions, from deep hurt through to the hope of a Brave New World as articulated on The Gathering. This is a concept of Prog-rock poetry coming of age with confidence to commemorate 1914-18 as the remembering of these years will be high in the social and cultural consciences as the generations who are at least one step away from those who experienced the trenches and the aftermath, are reminded of these sacrifices made as hundred years since the outbreak and the battles are experienced over the next four years.

The album though is not drenched in the mire and the blood the opening track Perfume River, the longest track on the album, opens with haunting bagpipe melody heard in the distance and then a whisper, as the bagpipe fades the keys take over, followed by Spanish style guitar, the opening may be over two minutes but it is beautifully simple; there is no need for lyrics you instinctively know you are about to embark on an emotional and personal journey. Then Fish is heard and the poetry begins, on a journey on a Vietnamese River. There is anger as the guitar becomes more strident that flows out of this mountain of a track like lava flowing out of a volcano, it is the ravages of war that is all around him as he awakes to the reality.

Blind To The Beautiful is a ballad that has deep meaning with its links with climate change and consequences of feasting at the table of greed and consumerism linking into the title track about failed relationships and there is a gritty realism to both the vocals and the musical accompaniment.

The final two tracks are not an anti-climax after the emotional outpouring from the five songs, Other Side of Me has a gentle intro and the words are poetry spoken full of wondrous yearning and wonder at what will happen next the song has a mesmerising trance-like feeling that draws you into his introspective thoughts. The closing track is fitting as about the strands of life and guitar solo is superb a perfect track to close the album.

This is an album built around acoustic sound that is grown and developed giving tracks their own shape and inferences, it has a mystical other-world feel as this is an album not about personal relationships but relationships, belong and lost in a wider context with whispers from the past sometimes heard loud as in the High Wood Collection on other tracks it is there but as a thought not a shout..

Bluesdoodles gives this CD TEN doodle paws out of TEN ….pawprint half inch

Track Listing
1. Perfume River
2. All Loved Up
3. Blind To The Beautiful
4. A Feast Of
5. High Wood
6. Crucifix Corner
7. The Gathering
8. Thistle Alley
9. The Leaving
10. The Other Side Of Me
11. The Great Unravelling

Musicians
Fish (vocals)
Robin Boult (guitar)
Foss Paterson (keyboards)
Steve Vantsis (bass)
Gavin Griffiths (drums)
Guests:
Liz Antwi – backing vocals,

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