Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

 

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

 

 

Who are the four excited bands talking about 4th UK Blues Challenge? They are Zoe Schwarz Blue Commotion; LaVendore Rogue, The Rainbreakers and Elles Bailey. There will be a fifth band joining the quartet of superb bands. The fifth band will be announced shortly after the Great British Rhythm and Blues Festival taking place at Colne 25th-27th August. The Jessica Foxley Unsigned bands who will be playing on the main stages have now been selected. From these Eight bands one will be chosen to join the bands already announced to take part in the Challenge on the 10th September. Find out who the eight bands that are in with a chance HERE.   

While we all wait in anticipation as to which band are joining the four who have already been nominated read about the bands and what they said when Bluesdoodles spoke to them.

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues ChallengeFour Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues ChallengeTell us what it means to Zoe Schwarz Blue Commotion to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

 ZSBC: Firstly, the fact that the number of our peers nominating is so large gives real credibility to the artists involved, so we are also proud about that.    We are also proud to be nominated as we see it as a recognition of our original music, concept and style.  We don’t write the songs to any kind of formula or to fit in with any cliche or pre-conceived ideas of what defines blues in 2017. Read more…..

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues ChallengeFour Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

Tell us what it means to LaVendore Rogue to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

LVR: We’ve been to hell and back a few times over the years, and playing in the states has to be a dream of any UK musician, so it’s an honour to be considered for the UK British Blues Challenge – we’ve been working hard over the last few years, and it’s great to see its been recognised by the UK Blues Federation. Read More …

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues ChallengeRainbreakers Talks About 2017 UK Blues Challenge

Tell us what it means to The Rainbreakers to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

RB: We were overwhelmed to have been nominated, especially when we don’t really consider ourselves to be a blues band as such. We think it shows willingness from the scene to accept the new approach to the blues that some of the younger bands of today are displaying. Obviously we would be thrilled to go through to the European and American challenges especially as we are hugely influenced by a plethora of bands from the states! Read More….

 

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

Tell us what it means to Elles Bailey to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

EB: Love the fact that European Challenge at Hell – didn’t know it existed on Earth. I am chuffed to bits to be performing in the Challenge this year. I am a newbie on the scene over the last twelve to eighteen months I have been quickly accepted in the Blues community. It has just exceed my expectations, definitely delighted to be performing in Liverpool and looking forward to seeing the other acts. It is definitely going to be a great night. Read More…

More about The UK Blues Challenge

What is the UK Blues Challenge (UKBC)?

An annual event organised by the UK Blues Federation (UKBlues) at a different location in the UK at which a number of bands/acts compete in front of a panel of judges drawn from across the blues spectrum. The winning band/act is invited to represent the UK at the following year’s International Blues Challenge (IBC) in Memphis and European Blues Challenge (EBC) which is held in a different European country each year.

The International and European Blues Challenges are organised by, respectively, the Blues Foundation  and the European Blues Union (EBU)

We are very pleased that this year’s event will take place at the legendary Cavern Club in Liverpool on Sunday 10th September 2017 starting at 16.00. More details can be found  and how to buy a ticket for the event HERE. UKBlues is excited to be bringing the blues back to the Cavern sixty years on!

How are the contestants in the UKBC chosen?

As an Active Member of the EBU meeting the EBU’s laid down criteria (see EBC rules here) and the sole UK Affiliate of the Blues Foundation, UKBlues are honoured to be invited to create and manage the selection process to choose the band or artist who will represent the UK at these prestigious events each year.
The first stage of the process this year saw a panel of more than 250 people from across the blues spectrum in the UK which included members of UKBlues, all UK based Active Members of the EBU, members of the Independent Blues Broadcasters Association, festival and gig promoters, writers (both online and print media), musicians, fans and blues supporters etc. being invited to submit the three UK acts that they felt would best represent the UK at the EBC and IBC.

Members of this panel were asked to place their choices in order (first, second, third) and points were awarded according to the position in which the acts are placed by you.

The 4 top scoring available acts after this process was complete were invited to participate in the UKBC where the contestants will perform in front of a panel of judges who will use the same criteria to award points to the contestants as are used at the EBC and IBC.
In a new departure this year, a fifth band will be invited to participate which will be selected from the bands who have been invited by Jessica Foxley Unsigned to play at the Great British Rhythm ‘n’ Blues Festival which takes place in Colne over the August Bank Holiday weekend –  These bands are, generally, under the radar and being selected to play at Colne is a big step up for them.

The band will be chosen by a panel of representatives of the Jessica Foxley Unsigned project and will be chosen on the strength of their performance at Colne.

The winner of the UKBC will be invited to represent the UK at both the 2018 EBC and IBC.

What are the selection and judging criteria?

When making their selections, the members of the panel are asked to bear in mind the following EBC rules which apply:

  • The leader of the band must have the nationality of the country he/she represents.
  • At least 50% of the members of the contestant bands must reside in the country they represent.
  • Acts who participated in a previous edition of the EBC, but did not win, may compete again after a period of 3 years.
  • Bands of which half or more of the musicians participated in a previous EBC with another band, may compete again after a period of 3 years.
  • Bands of which less than half of the musicians participated in a previous EBC with another band, may compete again after a period of 2 years.

Contestants at the UKBC, EBC and IBC are expected to perform at least 50% original music in their set and they are awarded points using the following criteria as laid down by the EBU:

  • Originality
  • Instrumental talent
  • Vocal talent
  • Stage presence
  • Blues content

You can read the full EBC rules here

This process is the same as that which has been used in previous years and is approved by the Blues Foundation and the European Blues Union

Four Excited Bands Talking About 4th UK Blues Challenge

A Thousand Horses In Conversation with Bluesdoodles

A Thousand Horses In Conversation with Bluesdoodles

 

A Thousand Horses In Conversation with Bluesdoodles

 

 

BD: I was delighted when Wilful PR sent me a review copy of your new album Bridges and the opportunity to find out yourselves, influence and lots more. When I saw you play live at Rockstock last December for me you were the band of the Saturday night.

A Thousand Horses, have answered the questions as a team hence four bands of fantasy and delight. Read more for an insight into Michael Hobby Lead Vocals; Bill Satcher Lead Guitar,  Zach Brown Guitar and Vocal & Graham Deloach Bass and Vocal

BD: What were your first musical influences growing up?
Thousand Horses:

Graham: I loved all of the classic rock n roll growing up, and still do! Led Zeppelin       is my favorite band of all time
Zach: My parents listened to oldies in the car when I was growing up. The first concert I can remember going to was The Beach Boys out at the lake near our house. I didn’t learn that there was music made after 1970 until a friend played the song Breakfast at Tiffany’s for me when I was 10 years old.
Bill:  The Beatles
Hobby: The Black Crowes

 BD: A Thousand Horses are making an impact, how did you get together and form the band and what is the significance of the name?

Thousand Horses:
Hobby: We formed the band in Nashville in 2010. Bill and I grew up together in Newberry, SC and met when we were 12 and 13 years old in a local music store. Graham is bills cousin so we would all 3 hang out every summer and play music. We formed ATH when we met Zach through a mutual friend in 2010. We named the band after a song we wrote when we formed the title A Thousand Horses.

We all write in the band together, separately, and with other writers here in town. Everyone in the band brings a great deal of creativity to song writing and our sound whether it be lyric, melody, or music, it’s a group thing. You never know where a song can come from or inspiration can spark!

BD: Bridges, is your follow-up album to your success with your debut Southernality last year. Produced by the Band, Corey Crowder & Dann Huff. With many involved in producing the sound who gets the final production say?

Thousand Horses:
Bill: Well, Corey Crowder and Dann Huff both really wanted to make the best A Thousand Horses record that we could, so at the end of the day we were the ones with final approval on the album and they wanted it to be that way. But they’re so badass that there wasn’t much to be debated about in the end.

BD:  How did you choose the tracks and then decide that Preachin’ To The Choir should be the single to proclaim the album?

Thousand Horses:
Graham: We love every song that is on the new album. We are always writing and creating new music and these are some of our favorites that we wanted our fans to hear. We chose ‘Preachin’ to the Choir’ as our first single because we thought it was a great song for our fans and a great first impression and representation of the new musical project (Bridges) as a whole.
 Bill: I think that every new song we write, record, lyric we jot down or melody we try and refine, we are always pushing it and ourselves to be better than what we have done before. So, in a way, yes it’s more challenging because we are pushing harder to be better. So most the pressure or challenge comes from within ourselves. As far as the album title “Bridges” goes, we decided to name the project that because we feel that song’s meaning encapsulates everything we have been through in the process of creating this new music. It’s a song about light heartily looking back and being able to laugh at the mistakes you made along the road of life. It kind of defines our point of view at this time in our lives.

BD: Bridges has seven of the thirteen tracks recorded live. Six of them at Metropolis Studio in London what do you feel this approach adds to the music and what made Metropolis the place to be for Bridges?

Thousand Horses
Zach: I think we wanted to show something real and raw with the Metropolis sessions. So much music coming out these days is so computer heavy that sometimes people don’t even know what artists actually sound like. We wanted to do something stripped down, one take, just us and our instruments. Metropolis has one of the only direct to vinyl machines left, so it was the perfect place to capture the live half of the record.

BD: I have always been interested in the lyrics of a song. Where do you get your inspiration for your songwriting?

Thousand Horses:
Hobby: Song writing has always been a passion of mine since I got my first guitar and learned to play it. Instead of learning other people’s songs I would make my own up. Lyrically I always wanted to have truth in my stories. A lot of what I write about is real life things that I have lived or been a part of.

BD: The music Industry is constantly evolving with changes often not for the better, how have the changes impacted on Thousand Horses Country Rock style of music?

Thousand Horses:
Graham: I think that the music has become more accessible as the industry and the genre of country music grows. This allows us to reach more people with our music.

 BD: I am sure you have many plans for 2017 and beyond for the band do you plan to tour UK and Europe?

Thousand Horses:
Zach: We love playing in the UK and are really looking forward to getting over to the rest of Europe. We have a few things in the works so stay tuned!

BD: Is there anything you want to say to your fans reading this interview?

Thousand Horses:
Hobby: Thank you for your continued support and believing in our music. We love ya and can’t wait to rock with you soon.

BD: If you were putting together the perfect fantasy band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing

Thousand Horses:
Graham: Steve Gorman of The Black Crowes on drums, Roger Waters of Pink Floyd on bass/vocals, Billy Powell of Lynyrd Skynyrd on keys, Mike Campbell of The Heartbreakers on guitar, Robert Plant of Led Zeppelin on lead vocal.
Zach: Gotta start with the rhythm section cause it’s the backbone of the band. I always wanted to play drums like Keith Moon growing up so I’d have him on drums and Ashton Barrett, who played with Bob Marley, on bass. Then I’d add my favorite guitar duo, Keith Richards and Ron Wood, because they sound cool playing anything! I’d round it out with Freddie Mercury as the front man.
Bill: Rich Robinson – Guitar, vocal. Joe Walsh – Guitar, vocal. Liam Gallagher – vocal. Steve Gorman – Drums. Benmont Tench – Keys. Paul McCartney – Bass, vocal. Produced by Jeff Lynne.
Hobby: Tom Petty, Dwight Yokam, Max Martin, Jon Paul Jones, Steven Tyler and Prince on drums.

 

Thank you for taking the time to chat with Bluesdoodles.  read the review for the latest album Bridges – HERE

A Thousand Horses In Conversation with Bluesdoodles

Ray Dorset aka Mungo Jerry Talking About Ealing, Festivals and Blues

Ray Dorset aka Mungo Jerry Talking About Ealing, Festivals and Blues

Ray Dorset aka Mungo Jerry Talking About Ealing, Festivals and Blues

In 1970, Mungo Jerry enjoyed world-wide fame with a song called “In The Summertime”. That song went to number three on the US chart and number one in England. Ray Dorset of Mungo Jerry talked with us about the history of the group. Now performing as Mungo Jerry and popular at Blues Festivals, performing this July at Ealing Blues Festival.

BD: I was delighted to have the opportunity to talk with you today, the writer of In The Summertime

BD: Lets start off with the here and Now. Mungo Jerry not in the 1970’s band format performing at Ealing Blues Festival July 2017.
RD: Mungo Jerry is me Ray Dorset. I am Mungo Jerry the artist performer. I have owned the name since 1972. Before I was even fired from the band. Once I was fired they considering the vocalist from the Strawbs to replace me it wouldn’t work. BD: Why? RD: They very quickly realised without Mungo there was no band called Mungo Jerry. In retrospect having the Mungo Jerry was a good move for me. Gives me an identity linking back to the band and suits the widespread music I play, African and world music rooted in the blues.

BD: Now playing in the Summertime in West London at Ealing’s Blues Festival what will you associated with 70’s pop bring to the Blues vibe?
RD: Mungo Jerry is not pop as it is known today. I will be playing In The Summertime it is expected. You can be assured I will not be doing what Shaggy did at Glastonbury with In The Summertime get crowds to wave arms in the air never expect a worldwide performer to keep asking people put arms in the air just can’t do it. The hit the band Mungo Jerry had with In The Summertime was one of many. Even then the essence of blues was present. BD: How? RD: We had no drummer; the percussion was from Cabasa combined with my foot stomping on the floor picking up from John Lee Hooker’s style..

BD: Back to Ealing Festival
RD: As I said I don’t do pop. I play some of my hits that is to be expected. Most importantly I play music I enjoy playing. I gauge the crowds reaction and what else is on the festival line-up. I am not there to educate or display a virtuoso performance. I am at a festival to entertain, hopefully the music will be a positive and therapeutic experience. I give something in my performance and get something back from the crowds it is karma. What will be fun at Ealing will be playing music the audience wants to hear. You have to remember the majority of the crowd what to be entertained on a summer’s day. They really do not care about the genre and if it is recorded music who produced it is of little importance. Music for them they either like or dislike. Hopefully they will like my music and I am really looking forward to playing Ealing this July and you never know there may even be schools mates from when I lived in West London.

BD: What were your introduction to music growing up in West London?
RD: I grew up in Ashford Middlesex in 1955 the population was approximately 16,500 the whole family was very, very musical. My Father played the harmonica and Mum the Piano and sang. On any occasion, Christmas, birthdays, family get-togethers we all did our turn playing and singing. I had no brothers or sisters so was taken by my Gran to lots of movies, particularly Ginger Rogers and Fred Astaire and especially musicals. Such as Annie Get Your Gun, The King & I, and Singin’ In The Rain. There was something in the rhythm and groove that had a therapeutic effect. When I was eight or nine my Great Uncle would take me to the local football club socials; I would sit as close to the band as possible I could feel what it would like to be the drummer. I started playing the washboard, then made a tea-chest bass and then saw it up to make a guitar. I had for Christmas a terrible plastic guitar and then when I was ten I got a proper guitar for Christmas. By the time I was eleven I was in my first skiffle band with friends from school, rehearsing around each other’s houses, yet never thought about being a professional musician.

I had an interest in electronics and had a crystal set for Christmas one year, build that and then investigated how it worked. A friend discovered transistors used to buy ex-government components and old radios and take them apart. Then I got a job in Timex in Brentford working in research drawing up quality control equipment. Hand –in-hand whilst I was playing in a band in the evenings and weekends. By the time I was fifteen I was playing in the White Hart and Red Lion in Sutton, on alternate Saturday evenings. The Rolling Stones played there on a Thursday evening. We were running out of repertoire from across various genres so started to write songs.

BD: You obviously loved playing music and the effect music had on yourself when listening and others when playing. Who influenced you?
RD: So many, from across the genres. From playing in the same venue as the Rolling Stones to when my band supported the Yardbirds, they were phenomenal, unique and real. Then bands like The Who created a fantastic groove the maximum R n’ B from three musicians; and rooted in the blues. From the British Blues Scene I explored the music that influenced them I have always been inquisitive and asked questions.
As I found music I explored the roots and the road led back to blues whether Bob Dylan or Woody Guthrie; who played a lot of Leadbelly. I listened to music from far and wide and continue to find new experiences like Daddy Long Legs based in America he does a great version of Bourgeoise Blues full of raw energy. Through discovering his music recorded in jail by Alan Lomax I found the other artist captured on Lomax’s tapes. Blues run deep from Robert Johnson through to Muddy Waters & BB King the list could go on they have been so influential.

BD: That leads us nicely to and linking back to Ealing Blues Festival. What does the Blues mean to you and can it be defined?
RD: Blues has a fundamental drive it is honest music. I have always listened to music associated with the blues, the old timers, British Jazz and my Mother loved Frankie & Johnny with Elvis Presley and I was paying in a Skiffle and Blues Band. Rock N Roll came to the fore with Bill Halley then Elvis Presley they go back to rural blues. Country and blues and of course Rockabilly white ghetto blues.
Enough people have defined the blues intellectually and socially for me it is about a feeling. There are so many different aspects of blues. There is an element of soul to it the feel is kind of rooted in the blues. The feel and soul reaches back to slavery, servitude working in the fields creating rural blues. Rising out of intense misery singing about the discontent, hurt complaining to a beat can be persuasive. Blues is about writing about what is happening and can be triggered by an event such as a hurricane or newspaper headline or a phrase overheard. You could say the roots of I Don’t Like Monday title and theme is a link in the chain of blues impacting popular music.
Blues is personified by for example, Sleepy John Estes, Married Women Blues electric guitar into a basic amp both bought from a department store yet created music that was timeless. The same goes for the legendary twelve-string played by Leadbelly both influential musicians over the decades. Stripped down to its basics it is guitar and foot stomping, from likes of John Lee Hooker as you get more excited the stomping gets harder creating a fundamental tempo. The instruments, lyrics and player meld into one delivering the blues. Blues has always been commercial once they sold records Howlin’ Wolf wanted to sell his records and was commercial and there is so much more than 12-bar blues it is a much more complex genre. It has to have an element of being unique not just replicated what has already been done and definitely for me in the blues less is more; I have definitely made that mistake. I find that today so many blues artists play the same style all the time reflecting what seems to be taught and the influence of X-factor type programmes. Take Joe Bonamassa he can play the guitar BUT it has all been done before.
I have written blues in various styles always been an influence. Looking to write and record in the future something that has not already been done in the past. It will definitely be influenced by all the soulful blues energy and hopefully create something unique. Music that isn’t just for a black guy to sing. American population is made up of immigrants from Europe, Asia and Africa. The music became the melting pot with influences from Eastern Europe, Germany, Ireland as they got together in homesteads and East met West. The instruments were mixed together whatever was available, parlour piano, banjo, harmonica, accordion all got mixed together as remembered folk music formed and re-formed into music we recognise today.

BD: During your long career, a jam with Peter Green & Vincent Crane resulted in the Katmandu Album, Case For The Blues
RD: I first met Peter Green when he was in Fleetwood Mac; he recommended a guitar shop to me. Then met him again when I was living in Grayshott Surrey where I lived for a while in a large house with a recording studio. Chris Hollands asked me if I fancied a jam with Peter Green I said yes, come round to my studio. Few days later another phone call Vincent Crane fancies a jam. So we got together with Peter Green, Vincent Crane(Keyboards), Len Surtees an old school friend on bass and cousin of motorbike racer John Surtees; Jeff Whittaker on percussion with sharp skills. We realised that we didn’t have a drummer so asked Jackie Lynton Band’s drummer Greg Terry to come round. So we had a big jam session, and thought possibly have a record from this so recorded on a cassette and 2” multi track.

BD: If you were putting together the perfect / fantasy band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing
RD: No not doing that the past is the past only now. BUT I would love to have a jam with Bob Dylan; Bruce Springsteen and Eric Clapton. If I could bring someone back to play it would be Vincent Crane he was a genius the way he played, whether classical progressive or rock. There would have been no ELP or Crazy World of Arthur Brown without his influence and keyboard skills. So sad he committed suicide a real loss.

 

Thank you for your time, been wonderful chatting with you as we wondered around the world of music, Mungo Jerry and In The Summertime

 

 

Ealing Blues Festival Leads with The Blockheads and Mungo Jerry

 

Tickets on sale here.

 

Leading the line-up this year are The Blockheads, one of the most underrated British bands of all time. Since 2000, Derek Hussey has been fronting the band, adding 21st century bite to the everyday observations of their late frontman Ian Dury. They will be celebrating the 40th anniversary of their album ‘New Boots & Panties’ by bringing their witty lyrics to their biggest London show of the summer.

Joining them as headliners across the weekend are Mungo Jerry, the blues, jugband & skiffle influenced band whose frontman and founder Ray Dorset played a number of Ealing venues in his formative years. The group are famous for their feel good summer anthems and responsible for one of the best-selling singles of all time, “In The Summertime”, which has sold over 30 million copies.

As always, Ealing Blues Festival will present the artists at the heart of the British blues scene, with performances from 2016 British Blues Awards finalists Tim AvesNorthsydeSam Kelly & Laura Holland, 2016 Sky Arts Guitar Star series finalist Steve Morrison and Amy Mayes, who recently performed with Jools Holland’s band for his Radio Two show. It is also proud to champion a number of emerging blues artists, and will feature showcases from Winnie & The RockettesGeorgie ChappleDu BellowsAndy Twyman and Tom Walker.

Ealing Blues Festival began as an independently-sponsored ‘free’ event in 1987. Over the years, the festival has developed in partnership with Ealing Council & The Event Umbrella to become one of the biggest blues festivals in the UK, with almost 6,000 people attending last year alone. Acts will perform across three stages in Ealing’s beautiful Walpole Park.

Ealing Blues Festival is one of 2017’s Ealing Summer Festivals, a series of eight separate events taking place in the borough between July and September. Set in some of Ealing’s most beautiful parks, the festivals bring people together in a collective appreciation of exceptional local and international talent across a range of artistic disciplines.

 

The Line UP

Blockheads
Mungo Jerry
Tom Walker Band
Laura Holland Band
Bourbon Street Revival
Du Bellows
Greg Coulson
Amy Mayes Band
John Crampton
Northsyde
Georgie Chapple Band
Tim Aves & Wolfpack
Steve Morrison & Blues Abuse
Marky Dawson
Andy Twyman
Sam Kelly’s Station House
Dan Sowerby & Hugh Budden
Winnie & The Rockettes
Mumbo Jumbo
Geoff Garbow Band
Robert Hokum’s Blues Festival All Stars
Uncle Buck
Little Steam
Mack
King Buster Blues Band

Ealing Blues Festival details

22th – 23th July 2017

Walpole Park, London, W5 5HS

12pm – 11pm

Tickets available from here

Advance tickets: £5 per day or £10 for the weekend (plus booking fees)

 

Ray Dorset aka Mungo Jerry Talking About Ealing, Festivals and Blues

 

In Conversation with Kenny Wayne Shepherd

In Conversation with Kenny Wayne Shepherd

 

In Conversation with Kenny Wayne Shepherd

BD: I was delighted when I was sent your latest album Lay It On Down to review via Mascot Label Group. The album has a beguiling mix of complexity and simplicity. Before we talk about the album, Ramblin Man and UK Tour lets go back to the beginning

BD: What were your first musical influences growing up in Shreveport, Louisiana?
KWS:
It was the first concert I went to Muddy Waters & John Lee Hooker when I was three years old. What an introduction to the blues in anybody’s life. For me it was the start of a lifelong connection with the blues. I just gravitated to the blues, there is an honesty about the music. It is music played with heart and soul. Blues define lyrical content. Dad loved the blues and introduced me to the music. I was influenced by and love a wide spectrum of genres including country R’n’B; Rock’n’ Roll and Funk but it was Blues I naturally gravitated to.

BD: What was it about the guitar that made this the instrument of choice and music your passion.
KWS: I loved the guitar and taught myself. I also love the drums, but have never sat down and learnt them. Not sure my parents fancied a drum kit being practiced in the house. I was attracted to the kinda music that features the guitar. Rock/Blues and Country they all featured the instrument and a lead vocalist. Not sure if I chose the guitar or it chose me.

BD: During your long career leading up to the release of your 8th Kenny Wayne Shepherd studio album you have explored the blues. What does the blues mean to you and how would you define the blues?
KWS: Blues is a timeless genre, it addresses the ups and downs in life. Often about difficult subjects it is the feel you get as the music takes you beyond overcoming what is troubling you. I myself play the happy side of blues what makes life good, celebrating life.  Blues is timeless it speaks to people whatever their age, colour or background. Add into the mix all this and it has spawned every type of modern popular music; inevitably you find yourself back at the blues.

BD: Lay It On Down, your 8th solo album, focuses on the lyrics as you take the listener on a journey.  The guitar is ever present whilst often complex in the tones and shapes achieved and the lead breaks are curtailed giving a contemporary fresh feel.  Moving away from blues power what led you to this change in direction?
KWS: I always play to the opportunity to shape and show the musical image that I feel needs to be created. Some songs like Ride Of Your Life gives you the opportunity to lay it on down hard. It was not the intent to play one way or the other the guitar chords just used to showcase everything. Records should take people on a journey. I set out with the goal that this would be the best album of my career. You have to continually set the bar high if you want to accomplish anything.

BD: Where do you get your inspiration for your songwriting?
KWS: Historically I have always based my song writing on my life experiences; or when writing with someone else their experiences. Until now actually written from fiction. Ride for Your Life is definitely fiction definitely not literal. I haven’t and I am sure none of the band have experienced escaping capture from the law. The music has an outlaw on the edge vibe so we wrote the song. It was a lot of fun, whereas Louisiana Rain is very personal showing an appreciation of where I come from.  BD: Do you write the music or the lyrics first? KWS: Nine times out of ten starts with the tune and then the lyrics but there are exceptions.

BD: You are playing Ramblin Man on the Outlaw Country Stage & Holmfirth in July and then back in UK & Europe in October for a tour. Does a new album help keep touring with your music fresh and vibrant?
KWS: Yes, have asked but been assured that on that day it is the right stage as calling that, but same thing as the Blues stage.  Looking forward to being back in the UK and again later in the year. I love touring and playing my music have a large back catalogue to choose from with a career spanning twenty-five years. New album is good and brings its own challenges; new songs to learn outside of the studio and having to work them into the set list so they fit in. I have worked songs from the album into shows I was playing last week in America. Still work to do to ensure the songs make the biggest impact, it is often trial and error revising the set lists as a tour progresses. It definitely keeps it interesting and always gauging the reactions from the audiences that all have favourites they expect to be in the set list.  The expectation from the fans is inevitable with a career of twenty-five years, lots of records played on radio and in the charts. There is a group of songs fans expect and want to hear so you have to walk a fine line when introducing new stuff.

 BD: If you were putting together the perfect fantasy band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing
KWS: Already have it with The Rides. Myself, Stephen Stills and Barry Goldberg.
Let me think

Drums: Chris Layton; my drummer, he is the best drummer for what I do

Bass: Danny McCormack No let’s put together a legendary group so have to be Willie Dixon he is so impactive on a song

Guitar: Albert King, Jimi Hendrix I would just love to have the opportunity to play alongside these guys.

Vocals: Muddy Waters

BD: Having mentioned The Rides, I loved the last album Pierced Arrow are you likely to tour in the UK with the band?  
KWS: We have toured in the States and have tried to put together a UK/European tour twice now just not come about.  We are planning a third album so hopefully a tour will come about.          

BD: Thank you for your time and insights into your music. Anything you would like to say to your many fans.
JWS: First I would like to say how much I appreciate the support I have ever since the first time I played when I opened for The Eagles in Wembly back in 1996 for a three night run. The loyalty of the fans once they find an artist they like they are a life-long fan. Secondly, I am really looking forward to playing UK & Europe again. I make a conscious decision to come back and tour Europe every couple of years whenever possible.  There has been a longer gap this time as been touring States with The Rides. I want to reach out to new fans of the blues, continuing to build a fan base for our brand of Blues and Rock n’ Roll.

In Conversation with Kenny Wayne Shepherd

No Entry Fee for Salute Music Competition

No Entry Fee for Salute Music Competition

 

No Entry Fee for Salute Music Competition

 

No Entry Fee for Salute Music Competition, the £20 entry fee has been removed! The innovative music competition announces the great news.

http://bluesdoodles.com/interview/feargal-sharkey-talking-about-salute-music-makers/Since Bluesdoodles interviewed Feargal Sharkey about the competition and his involvement there have been positive developments with the announcement of No Entry Fee for Salute Music Competition. Read what Feargal said HERE

Salute Music Makers, the revolutionary songwriter’s competition platform which launched in April amid great media interest, has now taken the unprecedented step of giving back the entry fee of £20 per track to all those who have entered to date, and have made the process totally free for up to four tracks to be entered thanks to the huge impact the initiative has had on the partnerships they have so rapidly developed with the likes of GRM DailyUnsigned Music Awards, UNILAD and many more.

This step to hand back money to thousands of songwriters is clearly a very rare occurrence with any enterprise, but once again highlights the importance of the songwriter to the Salute ethos.

As legendary artist and music industry expert Feargal Sharkey, who is spearheading  Salute Music Makers explains – ‘The level of support and encouragement we have received from the industry since launching our competition has been truly extraordinary. Thanks to the support of our partners, Salute is now in the enviable position to make entry absolutely, 100%, free. Yet again Salute is leading the way in providing proper support and encouragement for the next generation of great British talent. Now is your chance to win a £50,000, no strings attached cash prize and entry is free. One small challenge: just write the best song anyone has ever heard!’

One of the most important aspects of the whole initiative was the ambition of Salute to make their entry free within the second year, but thanks to the huge impact it has had from business partnerships, this dream has been realised within a matter of weeks since its launch. Since contestants began to upload their music, the Salute brand has grown more rapidly than anyone could have hoped. Salute have been emotionally humbled by the response from budding music makers and hence made the decision that giving back had to be the next step, and subsequently have now opened the competition to an even broader audience in their pursuit to find the next best UK grassroots music artist.

http://bluesdoodles.com/interview/feargal-sharkey-talking-about-salute-music-makers/

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

 

 

BD: Firstly, thank you for taking the time out to chat with Bluesdoodles today; July 4th.  I was delighted to have had the opportunity via Mascot to review your latest album Live at LaFayette; it is ninety-three minutes of music heaven, smooth, warm and spiced up with clever licks and breaks to keep the listening ear totally engaged.

SL: Great, I love hearing that we try to plan some of these things out, but other things we have no control over and just hope it all pans out when playing live.

BD: What were your first musical influences growing up in Louisiana?
SL: In Louisiana I was already into music, my elder brother Steve was always bringing music in to the house. Elvis Presley was a big thing in Mississippi when I was still living there. Then I discovered Scotty Moore. By the time we got here, there was always music in the area as it is such a big part of the culture here with the Cajun and Creole influences. There were shows on the weekend, on TV and live bands playing, bands would play at the openings for a store you name it a flatbed truck would have a band playing on there, that was in the area and it was great to have that. Walking down town on my first Mardi Gras locally and I sneaked into a bar because I was mesmerized by the sound on the jukebox it was Ray Charles. It was great my family would go back to New Orleans that was the first time I heard Jazz, Rn’B and second line rhythms and so forth. So between all the influences of the music I liked I became a big fan of Chet Atkins, The Jazz Cats and Wes Montgomery. I started out on the trumpet so I had all those jazz heroes like Miles Davies, Ornette Coleman and so forth. So by time I got into the blues which is more of a guitar thing I was thirteen and the list goes on and on… (laughing)

 BD: So what Made you change from the Trumpet to the guitar?

SL:  Well I actually kept up the trumpet at school from 10 years old, fifth grade up until my two years in college and twenty. By the time I started to play guitar the Beatles came along and everybody wanted to have a band. If Scotty Moore fired me up to learn how to play a guitar it was The Beatles that fired me up to play in a band, as did my best friend Tommy, he wanted to play drums and that was our first band he and I, guitar and drums, lot simpler back then! You know with the guitar learning Beatles songs, really for us it was the instrumental thing that worked up some of those songs, played our first gig, we were hooked. A little later I was working in a family operated music store Prof Erny – that was a great experience. He supplied the music, sheet music, instruments for all the band directors in the area.  They sold records, they had a guitar room, so I was lost in there most of the time. There was an older kid there who said man you have to listen to Chet Atkins. Well I heard of him so he sat down and started playing Chet songs it just blew my mind. He started to teach me finger style, so I had to practice that to get the right hand finger picking style of Chet. That was my entry in to the world of solo guitar meaning playing the melody, rhythm and bass lines all at the same time and think of the guitar as a solo instrument. By the time I started listening to the Delta Blues and getting into the blues that’s how I related to the finger picking of all the old blues cats. Started tackling the Slide, I had Chet’s Right Hand technique and slide on little finger of my left hand that started me on my path really.

BD: That all sounds really clever to me!

SL: Well sure shows how clever I was. I was young so into it, so enthusiastic, didn’t have any hang-ups, preconceptions or perceived notions. My worlds view is about figuring out the next chord.  Not a bad place to be, you don’t have prejudiced perception. So your view of reality has not been so imposed on, that you are not open to any and all ideas. I think that was one of the great things about being raised here in South Louisiana because music is such a part of the culture I was open to everything and all those influences.

BD: Yes lots people get closed into a style or approach very early one.

SL Yes they do, I think having played a wind instrument to start off with I came to the guitar with a different perspective, more like a horn player. Where you have to take a breath that affected my phrasing. I guess what I was trying to accomplish on the guitar was different from my contemporaries. They were coming more rock n’ Roll cranking it up to 10 and fire away nothing wrong with that I love it. It helped me in addition to that to think of it in a different way more dynamically. Also that is where the slide comes in because of its vocal quality. I didn’t realise it at the time, but many years later I recognise that my jazz and blues heroes were all striving to emulate the human voice so slide really leads itself to that because of its lyrical quality.

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny LandrethBD: Live at LaFayette is a long awaited live album. How did you decide which tracks to include from the three nights and the decision to have a mix of Acoustic & Electric and as a double album.

SL: That was one of the advantages of doing it here at home. Everything came together my engineer’s studio just few blocks away as a resource for equipment, had him there and musicians in the main are all close by. There is a real nice theatre that has been built since my last live album I did eleven years ago. It was perfect setting for this kind of thing for a multi-night stance. We went in on the Monday set up, sound checked rehearsed with my trio Steve Conn and Sam Broussard. We recorded three nights in a row, that way you can relax more, you have more than one go at it. The hardest thing about recording live is not to think about it, not worry about it, get into the moment just like you do at any other gig that is what you have to capture. So in order to decide which songs that was a little bit of a trip.  Some songs were real obvious, some of the instrumentals I wanted to get those down just like we play night after night with my trio. Then I knew I wanted Steve and Sam to expand some of the other songs that we had been playing like for example Back To Bayou Teche and Walkin Blues I knew they would wail on those, have more colour more texture creating a big sound. Acoustic is where it got really interesting I started to think well, some of these songs that had been electric all along and had bigger production in the studio like probably any songwriter would tell you. Some of those songs  started out with me just on an acoustic guitar coming up with ideas, melodic line, set of changes that led to an idea for a lick, then led to a line lyric line of song becomes a chorus. Takes a while! That is what the whole process revolves around just you on an acoustic guitar. Went back to that just to embrace the essence build on it somewhat with an ensemble it was fun cos then you are re-interpreting songs that had a bigger production on the albums. I have always felt a good song can be interpreted in a number of ways like Creole Angel and Bound By The Blues actually speak better as an acoustic setting.  Because there are so many lyrics they go by so quickly and I think the audience gets engaged more. There are some element of dynamics as well, we figured out the best first come out and do an acoustic set, take a break and then come back out and ramp it up. That is how we approached the recording as well, then I realised we had enough material to do a whole disc acoustic and another electric. We kept adding a song each night that is how it came about. I wish I could say I masterminded the whole thing from day one, had it all planned out. I always wanted to leave something to chance anyway cos that is where some of the more interesting stuff happens, but in terms developing into the concept of a double album it was kinda cool how that came about.

BD: If planned too much it can become too produced too sterile?

SL: Yes, it does nothing wrong with that if that is your thing.  That is what I love about the studio a lot of that is like a painting where you have a canvas and you are adding colours then you get up one morning and you go that looks really good here or embellish it here and that is great. The thing about a live performance the energy with audience and the performers it becomes actually something else more personal connection that way. It certainly propels us to play better there is no doubt about it I can’t really do that in the studio up to a point. To be honest our last album Bound By The Blues was pretty much live in the studio with my trio and so we had lot of that feel about it. But when I have an audience it just takes it to another level and that is what you want to capture with a live album. And the other thing was in that setting and have it be somewhat of a retrospective of different songs over my career which I felt took it to the next level as well more of a personal statement. Something I felt the long-time fans would appreciate the different interpretations you know and then  for newcomers be a good introduction. BD: And they will then go and explore your other albums! SD: I mean it was kinda like your life flashing before your eyes. To be honest it was a nice affirmation to have too many songs to chose from. I would far rather have that than like only have three albums for forty-six years on the road that would be little disappointing. That was fun for me I enjoyed that aspect of it.

BD: Tell our readers about your infectious sound delta blues and zydeco influences? And for people especially in UK what is it about zydeco, creole sound that you create, separating your sound from pure Delta?

SL: Two different things in that regard, there is common thread and that is the Blues.Zydeco music Creole much influence of their African roots, original tribes, sound, rhythms and syncopations in particular and that is the biggest difference between that and Cajun music. Cajun music is the descendants of Nova Scotia and the Great North up there who were deported and settled in this area and a lot of them grew up side-by-side with Creoles so there was a give and take, that is really beautiful there which is why the music is so rich and diverse. Delta Blues across the Mississippi River there is a thread if you listen to say Mississippi John Hurt, playing his acoustic guitar and singing basically telling a story, call them story songs. Then if you were to hear Clifton Chenier playing Blues always in his repertoire, he mixed up blues with everything else and he formulated the sound, the great pinnacle to Zydeco sound there was that element to it. Zydeco per se is real upbeat, syncopated and really the best of it Clifton on his accordion, his drummer Big Robert and his brother Cleveland on the rub board. The three of them would just get of the stage a played old style Zyedeco, I just loved it, you just can’t not move when you hear that music, it is good for the soul.

BD: What are the Blues or how do you define the Blues the perennial debate?

SL: For me main thing about the blues if you take an overview it is such a profound experience again speaking culturally again. It is Grace in the face of adversity. Lot of the kids coming up they learn the licks try and get across to them they need to study the history of the players and the time they lived and what they were going through. It is the back story that is so important and all of them that as a common denominator overcoming challenges. That is why Blues is a universal language, it is something people all over the world relate to. It is these challenges really the things that unite us, I think that is why it resonates with people everywhere. It will always be pertinent, always evolve, will have new players. A lot of the old guard we have lost; not many left at all. That is probably true of all folk music or music that is important of the people. When I say folk music I literally mean music comes from people and their lives, big part of history there that’s when you factor that into story songs it becomes a richer experience that to me is profound.

BD: For me it was your opening phrase Grace in the face of adversity is just brilliant.

SL:  Part of it is all the trials and tribulations and my God! The things that people went through was just horrific and beyond belief. But they would turn to music and they would express, there would be a release in that expression that joy in the moment a thing to have, there is something about that connection that does make it so profound. It is not just another fad or pop song sells in the moment but doesn’t equate to the test of time and that is the big difference. Great music to me is music that stands the test of time.

BD:  Your bottleneck/slide guitar style is so full of power what makes your playing stand out from the crowd and your distinctive sound many describe you as King of Slydeco?

SL: I think what happened to me looking back I am so comfortable is so many different genres of music because of growing up here and that is great, versatility is a good thing. It is possible to go in too many directions at once I think when I landed on and beginning to work with the slide and started to make my way with it I realised it was a way to crystallise all these influences into a unified sound that was my own. Very much included songwriting as well and that became my focus. The fact that I started out on another instrument, influenced by all the other instruments in the area, accordion, rub board, triangle everything because slide offers a greater potential for creating sounds, I picked up on that pretty early and would begin to try and emulate some of these other instruments so I think that is part of it. I definitely made some discoveries that opened the window in terms of possibilities, harmonically, percussively, lyrically I could accomplish all that it was a bigger layer of sound from one instrument so to speak. All those influences come to bear you hope some like cosmic dust rubs off on you. As I got more opportunities to work with people, I always paid attention to how they worked and it has to be your passion.

 BD: If you were putting together the perfect fantasy band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing
SL: I would probably but my heroes together, I could watch them play just sit on the side of the stage

Accordion: Clifton Chenier

Drums: Big Robert, just primitive style never heard anything like him.

Bass:  Noel Redding

Guitar: BB Guitar, Jimi Hendrix

I met Jimi Hendrix in store in Baton Rouge he had run away from his road manager and I talked to him . I heard BB; Jimi and Clifton play for the first time within a year when I was 16/17 years old. I have also  met them all, takes us back to your first question that was incredible experience set the bar so high not a bad way to start out

 

BD: Are you planning to come to the UK.

SL: We are Yes, hopefully in the fall if not certainly 2018. 

 

BD: Thank you for taking time out on 4th July

 

Note from editor: Check out his music over at Sonny Landreth

 

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

LaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues Challenge

LaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues ChallengeLaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues Challenge

LaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues Challenge

 

 

BD: firstly, thank you for taking the time out to chat about participating in the 4th UK Blues Challenge, Blues, your music and more.

LVR: It’s our pleasure – we’re thrilled to have been put forward for the competition!

BD: 2017, sees the fourth UK British Blues Challenge.  This year the UKBlues Federation are “Bringing The Blues back to The cavern 60 years on..” Tell us what it means to LaVendore Rogue to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

LVR: We’ve been to hell and back a few times over the years, and playing in the states has to be a dream of any UK musician, so it’s an honour to be considered for the UK British Blues Challenge – we’ve been working hard over the last few years, and it’s great to see its been recognised by the UK Blues Federation.

BD: What are the Blues to LaVendore Rogue? Do you feel British Blues has a different feel to what is being currently produced in Europe, United States and elsewhere in the world?

LVR: A lot of the biggest British Bands in history started off playing Blues but took it somewhere else. Just look at The Rolling Stones or Led Zeppelin.  Nowadays, it seems a lot of UK acts lean towards the heavier Blues Rock side of things, which is perhaps reflective of the US artists who took their influence from the 60’s Blues Boom. Whereas in Mainland Europe there is real wide variety of artists such as the Dawn Brothers or Daniel Norgren who are doing something different, but still with its roots in the blues. Obviously the US is where it all began and it’s good to see that despite the influx of “Blues Rock”, they are still producing artists who take their influences from early American Music, people like Blind Boy Paxton or the Carolina Chocolate Drops and even Mud Morganfield.

LaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues ChallengeBD: Your latest album is A Night In The North, LaVendore Rogue live in a Blues club; tell us a bit about your album and the reaction your interpretation of blues is received by audiences?

LVR: We recorded the album at Sedgefield Rock & Blues Club in January. We didn’t plan on doing so, until 10 minutes before show time, and we’re all really pleased with the result. Joel mixed and mastered the album, and we feel it’s the best thing we’ve done to date. Certainly the most honest.

We were keen to include a cross-section of everything that’s influenced us and that we’ve done, so the album goes from pre-war Blues (“Oh Death” by Charley Patton) to the 60’s British Blues Boom (“Get Off Of My Cloud”, by The Rolling Stones) and includes several Hokie Joint songs too (“Chocolate Cake”, “The Way It Goes…Sometimes”). Oh and obviously there’s some LaVendore Rogue material in there as well. To keep things fresh, there’s also a couple of new songs on the album too.

When we first started as LaVendore Rogue, the reception was mixed, although people generally either love us or hate us. However we’ve worked hard to put together a set that will appeal to lots of people, including ourselves. Songs such as “Chocolate Cake” and “Oh Death” always seem to receive a fantastic reaction, so we’re obviously doing something right when it comes to honouring The Blues.

In our opinion, a lot of the British Blues Scene is leaning more towards rock music more than Blues and songwriting has been replaced with too many guitar solos. Although is good to see a broad spectrum of the blues taking part in the UK challenge.

However our focus is on songwriting and using a song as a way to tell story. At the end of the day, 99% of people go home from a gig singing a chorus, not a guitar solo.

BD: What do you feel The UKBlues Federation can bring to the UK Blues what would you like the Federation to be doing for Blues artists on the circuit in Britain today?

LVR: It’s very difficult for a band to gain much profile without a fairly large budget. We feel there are a lot of great undiscovered bands on the British Blues scene that aren’t getting the attention they deserve for one reason or another. In fact, many are far more interesting that some of the bands that are at the top of the ladder. As artists in our thirties we hope to playing for another thirty and perhaps the Blues Federation could play a pivotal role in bringing the blues to a younger generation, perhaps through schools workshops or through making connections in Universities.

BD: If you were putting together the perfect band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing?

LVR: That’s a tough one…we all have very different tastes in music, in many different genres, so the result could be somewhat catastrophic!

BD: The band they would create is left to our imagination. Thank you for your time. The challenge at The Cavern on 10th September will be an amazing night of live music as we hear the five bands – LaVendore RogueElles BaileyZoe Schwarz Blue Commotion The Rainbreakers and the winner of the Jessica Foxley Unsigned to be decided at the 2017 Great British Rhythm & Blues Festival at Colne. Buy Your ticket here and be part of a great night HERE.

LaVendore Rogue Talks about 2017 Blues Challenge

In Conversation with Jared James Nichols back on UK Tour

In Conversation with Jared James Nichols back on UK Tour

In Conversation with Jared James Nichols back on UK Tour

 

BD: Thank you for taking time to talk to Bluesdoodles again we are ready and waiting for Black Magic your new highly anticipated album to arrive on the desk from Listenable Records. In the meantime you have released the first single as a tempter “Last Chance”. The number feels heavier, what inspired you to write the number?
JJN: It is definitely heavier, the whole record is full of different shades, tones and styles. People will not be expecting it to be so heavy, decided to release Last Chance to come out with a bang from the new album to grab the ear. It is a sample of styles the album will be exciting lots of blues influences and some really great moments with even some funky stuff.

Listen to Last Chance Here

 

BD: You have talked a lot about the inspiration the Blues provides you. What do you believe spicing it up with Rock adds to the format; or what is your definition of The Blues in 21st Century?
JJN:
Playing now, it is music that when I play the masses of 2017 can relate to understand and enjoy the music. It is a fine line with the blues, honouring the blues legacy with what music people want to listen to. I try to bridge the gap with influences from the classics with modern influences. I have absorbed the music of people I have supported from Walter Trout; Zakk Wylde; UFO; Saxon they do influence with the reaction from different crowds. Underlying is always the Blues.  Sprinkling the blues through the music so my generation can re-discover the blues. With the music alive and exciting fresh and modern, that way the blues will survive and grow with new guys and girls playing and appreciating the music.

BD: You are back in the UK with a mix of shows, headlining supporting and Festivals. What excites you about playing in the UK; as your recognition grows?
JJN: Every time I return it gets better, the audiences in the UK really get the music I play.  The audiences have a respect, love and knowledge of music; you can talk to a guy at the bar and they will have a depth of knowledge and understanding. I love playing here as I have been heavily influenced by the British Blues explosion.

Starting out with two headline shows tomorrow Wednesday 21st June at the Grimsby Yardbirds and couple days later in Milton Keynes Craufurd Arms Saturday 24th June.  Then the following week starting on the 25th opening for Blue Oyster cult, which I am very excited about. Then it is back to USA to do work on finishing my forthcoming album Black Magic. Then it is back to UK for opening for UFO which will be a blast and then two great festivals Ramblin’ Man & Steelhouse.  The live shows will be such a great opportunity to play to new audiences.

Full Details of the tour can  be found on Bluesdoodles post HERE

BD: Do you make any changes to your set list depending on who you are opening for? Or is it a shorter version of your standard headline selection?
JJN: I change the set list to reflect who I am opening for to feed the crowd. With Walter I could include in the set cold slow blues whereas Zakk Wylde something heavier, like Mountain or Cream. Love to include music that adds an edge from Muddy Waters through to Grand Funk Railway cater for the artist and the audience. I just do it all when it is a headline show. We never really have a set list on the floor. We go with the flow, talk it through play two songs and build from there using the crowd’s reactions. The music flows and the live event gives it a feel that suits the occasion.

BD: You are coming to Wales to drive up the Mountain to Steelhouse,  it will be a very different venue to when you opened for Walter Trout at The Tramshed last year. Does Wales dig your form of Blues Rock?
JJN: It is great playing in Wales, love the scene the audiences love the same stuff as I do. First time I played was at a rugby club near where Steelhouse is held; the people were awesome they love to rock out. Great to play in such a fabulous new venue in Cardiff and looking forward to returning to play at a festival. Sounds a real blast and want to be part of the fun.

In Conversation with Jared James Nichols back on UK Tour BD: You are the ultimate power trio with the guitar flashing its licks & riffs. Have you played with the rhythm boys for a long time as there is an innate understanding of the direction you are taking each track.
JNN:  Met the guys in Los Angeles when I first moved from Wisconsin. Erik was the first guy I met in LA he had just moved from Sweden; I saw the bass and asked if I get any gigs would you like to play with me.  I then asked him if he would like to jam and we needed a drummer, he knew Dennis who had moved from Sweden a couple of weeks previously.  We jammed and then got gigs that was five-and-a-half, nearly six years ago. We grew organically jamming to start with now we have played over five-hundred gigs we know what we are doing. There is a special kind of vibe we know how someone is going to react. With only three guys in the band can’t hide behind anything; it is fun to push the music as far as you can. Every time we play a song live it is different; sometimes solos are longer other times more bass we bring in changes.

 BD: What other plans and excitements have you got planned for 2017 & beyond into 2018?
JJN: Touring with Saxon & UFO in the Fall across USA & Canada for 5-6 weeks. Obviously completing and releasing the album and hope to be over to the UK again end 2017/beginning 2018 to showcase the new record.

 BD: We asked you your fantasy band when we talked last year so what are you listening to at the moment; whether on the tour bus or relaxing?
JNN:  Mmm; I am making an effort to listen to new music loving the latest from Blackberry Smoke; and following on from touring with Walter Trout his stuff and off course all the usual suspects. I am loving listening to live bootlegs on You Tube. If you type into search any artist Bootleg lots of exciting music comes up including Jimi Hendrix; Cream; Eric Clapton and more. Digging back to find unknowns so much stuff is covered in dust.

BD: Once again thanks for your time and looking forward to see you at Steelhouse and having the opportunity to review the new album Black Magic

Check out Bluesdoodles Reviews –

Jared James Nichols Live – @ The Tramshed supporting Walter Trout HERE
Jared James Nichols Live – @ Robin 2 supporting Glen Hughes HERE
EP review –  Highwayman HERE
Album Review Old Glory and Wild Revival HERE

*Photo credit Rob Blackman

In Conversation with Jared James Nichols back on UK Tour

Feargal Sharkey Talking About Salute Music Makers

Feargal Sharkey Talking About Salute Music Makers

In conversation with Feargal Sharkey as he discusses the excitement and opportunities from new style competition – Salute Music Makers competition

BD: Huge thank you for making time to speak to Bluesdoodles about Music and your new project as the face of Salute Music Makers

 Feargal Sharkey Talking About Salute Music Makers

BD: Announcement of another competition with TV and Public vote! What is Salute Music Makers and why is it needed now?

FS: This is different, it is a very simple idea, and there is nothing clever about the concept. Not to be overly jingoistic but the fact is the UK has produced some of the best, long lasting popular music across a range of genres. I truly believe the talent continues the great music was not a blip of a generation or two. We are the second most successful nation when it comes to music outside of North America. Given our population this demonstrates the massive impact on music across the genres. Simple truth in the world there are only two teams in the premier league of music U.K. & U.S.A.

What musicians need is the opportunity to showcase their extraordinary talent I feel passionate about this. The next truly original artist is just around the corner and they need help to develop.

BD: How does Salute Music Makers differ from other music competitions like The Voice, and Britain’s Got Talent?

FS: Firstly and most importantly there are no strings attached to the prize money. It is entirely up to the winners how they spend the money Salute Music Makers will have no influence on this decision, as much power and control as possible will be in the hands of the artists themselves. They have the control to use the money on their terms, make several albums, set up a management company, make a film whatever they feel is the best use of the money for them. It is open to all types of music it has to be original. If you see the competition as an easy way of reaching the top leading the life of a rock star then this is not the competition for you. The competition is to find the great musicians out there – with the winners having a financial platform to develop and grow. This is for great musicianship where you can appreciate the talent. The key to great music is songwriting, it is the song that sells, and it is the song that identifies the group. We are looking for the greatest songwriter’s great melodies and powerful words this is the heartbeat and foundation of music. The focus will be on the craft of songwriting.

BD: With the opportunity for aspiring Music Makers to upload their music from 27th April when does the upload window close?

FS: The upload window closes on June 30th then the competition begins in earnest.

BD: How will the listening and judging process be conducted. Who are the Judges and what will they bring to the process?

FS:  We have a huge panel of judges at our disposal. The judges will be matched to the genre of music, so experts will listen and interpret, judge – Electronica, rock, blues etc.… The judges are experienced industry experts with a depth of knowledge in the area of music they specialize in.

Then it will be opened to public opinion for the hundred entries selected by judges. They will vote using an App they download. The public then can listen to all 100 entries or fewer as they please. The system is clever voting fifty-nine times is not going to happen IP addresses will be filtered. This is a super cool process if there is any belief that votes to an artist are suspect that an entry will be suspended; if investigation confirms they are cheating  they will be removed from the competition.

The Public vote will decide the Best Six Acts.

Two Television Programmes will then be aired in October and these finalist will receive £10,000 and the overall winner a further £40,000.

BD: Sounds a really interesting concept how did you get involved?

FS: I was introduced to three young men at the beginning of the year and thought it was a fantastic idea. BD: The brainchild of entrepreneurs of Salute Music Makers are Lars Bylehn, Michael Bylehn, Jean-Claude Charnier, Patrick Butterfield and Minesh Patel.

It took me back to the early days of The Undertones. Terri Hooley’s record shop Good Vibrations. Terri gave us £100 to use. We paid for Eight hours of studio time recorded Teenage Kicks as an Ep. This would probably not have happened if did not have this support in the early days. It was a pat on the back and practical help Salute Music Makers is a modern equivalent. With the focus on the songwriting for me an innate talent often overlooked. It is an exciting project to be involved in. With songs the heartbeat of music taking centre stage.

BD: I asked about dream band Feargal laughed said my tastes are too diverse changes with the moment. We did though get an insight into a play list on random while on a twenty-minute drive around the North Circular in London.

FS: Hard Floor – Spencer Davis Group – Little Dragon – Paul Weller  …..

BD: Thank you for your time and looking forward to the Public element of a completion focusing on the signwriting Salute Music Makers

Borderline Beckons Mollie Marriott and Debut Album

Borderline Beckons Mollie Marriott and Debut Album

In Conversation as
Borderline Beckons Mollie Marriott and Debut Album

Mollie Marriott, daughter of former Small Faces and Humble Pie singer/guitarist Steve Marriott and step-daughter to singer Joe Brown took time out to chat with Bluesdoodles. With debut album Truth Is A Wolf due out later this year Mollie is performing an intimate concert at London Borderline on Thursday 1st June 2017. Mollie took time out of a busy schedule having recently toured with Wilko Johnson & Paul Weller.

BD: Mollie thank you for taking the time to chat to Bluesdoodles
MM: Thank you as well, always good to talk about music.

BD: You are the daughter of Steve Marriott; until now your music career as a backing singer for many musicians including your step-father Joe Brown. What was the motivation to step out front taking centre stage?
MM: Stepping out on centre stage, felt right now was the right time. I was not bothered before I loved being a backing vocalist. I could turn up sing and go; not get involved with all the other stuff. I had seen the scary stuff connected with the industry. I had watched what it can do to people, it put me off. I wanted to write my own stuff, I knew that I had to live life first. I am influenced by Stevie Nicks  &  Alanis Morissette; raw and dark honest that is who I wanted to write. I now have the head space; with a few breakdowns to write about. In the family the last is called Crash 2012. Hitting Rock bottom is good as the only way is up to rebuild your life as you want it. Now I am in a good place since I hit 30; being in your thirties is great. I was a young mum at 23; when your twenties are about having fun with people in your life because they are around. Thirty, you become your own person now where you want to go and who you are so all is good.

BD: With a Debut Album Truth is A Wolf announced. How did you decide upon releasing as the first single the number Control?
MM: Previously I had a testing tie with record label; basically had no control It was a case of Beautiful women using their beauty to control and trample you. A Mother figure who then betrayed and let you down, as line in my songs says “You saved me to break me”. Taking back control of my music was important so this was the right single to start again with my career, I am in the driver’s seat going where I want to go. I co-wrote this number with Sam Tanner, lead vocalist with Brother Strut. We wrote the song together, we knew right from the beginning Control was the perfect song to release as the first single off the album Truth Is A Wolf.

BD: Tell our readers about the forthcoming album, how did you decide on the title the type of music that best describes your debut?
MM:  I went to Nashville to start writing the album. The title track Truth  Is A Wolf written by Gary Nicholson, he was going to give it to Bonnie Raitt or Susan Tedeschi who are lots of my influences. I heard the demo just wurli and vocals and thought that sums up my album it was the perfect tile song. With tracks that reflect my life Broken, ending of a relationship and the effect that had on me and my daughter. The song Truth Is A Wolf, tied it all in a bow.  So many types of music can be used in the description. It is a Rock Album. Yes, many people I have asked as I really do not know have said it is bluesy-rock. Within the Backing vocals there are elements of gospel and country. It is a Rock mix definitely NOT pop laughing. Also, grungy elements. I am a grunge girl love Chris Cornell, Pearl Jam, Jagged Little Pill a favourite album sounds a bit like that as well.

BD:  Mollie you are definitely making a statement with your next Gig coming up on the 1st June at The Borderline with guests?
MM: Yes, so exciting, this is my first proper headline gig. With support from Anna Kratz, a special friend. We met in Nashville I went to one of her shows as she sung I was completely broken, sobbing she was singing y life, Anna is a wonderful songwriter writing with Ed Sheeran and many more. Pocket dragon are a cool band, with a female lead. It is so important to me that the night is Woman led. I want people to o listen to me as Mollie, Mollie Marriott; NOT “Mollie Marriott daughter of Steve Marriott” – that was not the name on my Birth Certificate. People have said well why not Mollie Brown? Joe Brown my step-dad then there is all that baggage as well. So sticking to the name I was given at birth Mollie Marriott.

BD: With a London Gig under your belt. Are you taking Mollie and her band to be heard outside of London?
MM: Yes, definitely tour outside of London. I love getting outside of London to venues in towns and cities. Played The Tramshed in Cardiff when opening for Wilko Johnson BD: Had to miss that show to my disappointment as away in Sheffield.  
MM: What a great venue loved playing Cardiff, Nottingham was fun as was Apex in Bury St Edmunds. Playing Liverpool with Paul Weller was mad, even a little bit scary a room full of mods. My show will be exciting to watch, all my band is very visual to watch we move about.

BD: If you were putting together the perfect band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing?
MM: Oh My God that is such a difficult question, will change the moment I put down the ‘phone Mollie laughs and says:-

Bass: Has to be Flea visually rocks.
Drummer: Richie Hayward – he has to have been the best drummer ever!
Guitar:  This is so difficult going to upset so many people has to be Stevie Marriott (such an under-rated guitarist)
Guitar: Joe Bonamassa
Vocals: Chris Cornell (he has such an amazing voice)

BD: Thank you for your time, looking forward to hearing the whole album and seeing your show when you take it on the road.

Borderline Beckons Mollie Marriott and Debut AlbumMOLLIE MARRIOTT LIVE AT LONDON’S BORDERLINE
THURSDAY 1 JUNE 2017

WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

POCKET DRAGON & ANNA KRANTZ

Daughter of legendary Small Faces and Humble Pie
singer/guitarist Steve Marriott, plays intimate London show

24 Hour Box Office – O8444 780 898
Book tickets from 
The Gig CartelAlt TicketsSee Tickets