Bridges building A Thousand Horses Southern Rock on New Album

Bridges building A Thousand Horses Southern Rock on New Album

Bridges building A Thousand Horses Southern Rock on New Album

Opening with a driving of beat drums as the horses are rounded up and A Thousand Horses ride across the Bridges of their own creation this is music that is infectious.  As you get immersed into a blaze of glory A Thousand Horses takes you not to one bridge, spanning one river. This is thirteen tracks exploring Bridges that span, fast flowing melodies; lyrics with twists and turns, fulsome ballads and the slower eddies that take you nowhere but always a deep memorable moment in time.

Bridges builds on the success of their debut album Southernality; with heavy injections of Southern Rock, never drowning out the country rooted power of the lyrics unveiling a story punctuated by soaring riffs, licks and the rhythmic drive of the drum and bass. The thirteen tracks divide the album into two; first six tracks are brand new studio recordings that will soon be firm favourites at the live shows. Then seven tracks recorded live, the majority in London at Metropolis studio. The last track being the first hit, played on country radio, the infectious crowd sing-along number Smoke. Recorded back in the home of Country where it all began in Nashville.

Third track in, Preachin’ To The Choir, hits the spot with its gritty edge of the real world of partying, and drinking on a Saturday night after a tough working week.  This isn’t gospel it is a working person’s anthem. Tinged with anger yet totally catchy an in the moment an ear worm that makes it perfect for radio play. The beat throbs and the melody curls as we are introduced to One Man Army, as we are taken deep into the essence of southern music it is the vocals that have to be able to engage and tell the story. This is done with slower consideration almost acoustic, before with a swirl of sound the chorus lifts the song. everyone wants a man who can be your bridge  protecting you from hardship and cruelty always around and always can be counted on! The pace is slowed down for the title track Bridges, these are the ones you burn in life with the backing vocals adding another texture. Southern rock warm and rich with the heat rising then cooling with the words that paint the scene this is story telling at its best.

A Thousand Horses through there irresistible Country Rock has connected us with the Album Bridges.  Closing the first part of the album is the standout track Weekends in a Small Town. It has a beauty, the music has a fluidity that captivates full of yearning, capturing living in a small town. This is a story anyone who has lived in a small town can instantly recognise.

The live tracks remind you why Southernality was such a hit in 2015 and why A Thousand Horses add something to the tracks when they play live. The repeat of Preachin’ To The Choir is stripped back to its Country heart acoustic and gives the lyrics even greater focus. Re-visiting the title track we hear the voices of the band and this affirms this number will become a firm favourite adding to the strength and depth of A Thousand Horses set list. A Thousand Horses are a quartet with Southern drive as Michael Hobby; Bill Satcher, Zach Brown and Graham Deloach  combine together creating a mighty force of rock infused country, sizzling with attitude and melodic fervor as we meet those Bridges in the road head on.

In life one bridge is never enough and that is true of the Album as the deep Country bridge connect with rock; hill country and so much more Bridges; and takes us across stormy waters on a cascade of melodic intensity reinforced with storytelling lyrics of music that connects to your inner feelings. The bridges we burn and those we cross or ignore make up our life’s story captured in an album.

A Thousand Horses – Bridges – BMLG Records

NINEpawprint half inchdoodle paws out of TEN ….

Track Listing

    1. Blaze Of Somethin’
    2. Burn Like Willie
    3. Preachin’ To The Choir
    4. One Man Army
    5. Bridges
    6. Weekends In A Small Town
    7. Travellin’ Man (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    8. Preachin’ To The Choir (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    9. Sunday Morning (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    10. One Many army (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    11. Bridges (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    12. First Time (Live From Metropolis Studios London)
    13. Smoke (Live From Printers Alley Nashville)

Bridges building A Thousand Horses Southern Rock on New Album

Rainbreakers Talks About 2017 UK Blues Challenge

Rainbreakers Talks About 2017 UK Blues Challenge

4th UK Blues Challenge At The Cavern Liverpool

Rainbreakers Talking About 2017 UK Blues Challenge


 

BD: firstly, thank you for taking the time out to chat about participating in the 4th UK Blues Challenge, Blues, your music and more.

RB: Thanks for having us.

 BD: 2017, sees the fourth UK British Blues Challenge.  This year the UKBlues Federation are “Bringing The Blues back to The cavern 60 years on..” Tell us what it means to The Rainbreakers to have been nominated to participate in the challenge with the chance of representing the UK in Hell, Norway and Memphis U.S.A in 2018?

RB: We were overwhelmed to have been nominated, especially when we don’t really consider ourselves to be a blues band as such. We think it shows willingness from theK scene to accept the new approach to the blues that some of the younger bands of today are displaying. Obviously we would be thrilled to go through to the European and American challenges especially as we are hugely influenced by a plethora of bands from the states!

 BD: What are the Blues to The Rainbreakers? Do you feel British Blues has a different feel to what is being currently produced in Europe, United States and elsewhere in the world?

RB: To us the Blues is just good music that is soulful and portrayed with meaning. The blues has influenced almost the entirety of modern day music, so to us it’s a huge umbrella term covering a wide variety of different styles. We would say that the British Blues scene has just as much variety and depth as any of the styles we’ve seen coming from Europe and the US. The bands we’ve met from both places have their own unique style and are usually influenced by a melting pot of artists from both sides of the pond anyway. So, yeah the Blues here has its own feel as much as the Blues there has its own.

Rainbreakers Talks About 2017 UK Blues ChallengeBD: Your latest EP is entitled Rise Up; tell us a bit about your EP and do you have plans for a full album.?

RB: The latest EP was a chance for us to explore our own songwriting and recording ability. We have a friend, Robin Andrews, who is an amazing Drum and Bass producer signed to Blu Mar Ten Music, and he was willing to spend time with us in our own studio to explore some different ideas and come at the recording process in a different way. The hope was always to use his differing background to most producers in the scene and see what came out of it. We were pleasantly surprised with the results and all of the feedback from reviewers and fans alike has given us huge encouragement to keep on experimenting with our ideas when it comes to recording again. For now all we can say is that we do have plans for another record. You’ll have to wait and see….

BD: What do you feel The UKBlues Federation can bring to the UK Blues what would you like the Federation to be doing for Blues artists on the circuit in Britain today?

RB: The main task of the federation has and should always be to reenergize the scene in the country so that more people keep music live and try new ways to draw in the younger crowds because without the younger audience taking the mantle the scene won’t last forever. All they can do for now is continue to give new bands, like ourselves and the other acts in the challenge, a chance to perform in front of people and push their careers further. Without opportunities like this we couldn’t keep reaching new fans and keep performing.

BD: If you were putting together the perfect band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing?

RB: Good question!! We’d have to have the drummer from The London Souls, Chris St. Hilaire, insane rhythms and ability. Then with Chris Wood of The Wood Brothers, incredible player on both electric bass and double bass!! Oh and then we’d have Brian J from Pimps of Joytime as the frontman, great vocals and guitar work! Then for us it would have to be King Zapata from Gary Clark Jr’s band for his guitar work, both as lead and his playing ability as rhythm. That’s a band right there! Especially when you complete it with Mariachi Flor de Toloache, the backing singers and players from The Arcs, doing what they do best! If you havent’ heard of them, look ‘em up, you will be amazed!!

 

BD: Thank you for your time. The challenge at The Cavern on 10th September will be an amazing night of live music as we hear the five bands – LaVendore RogueElles BaileyZoe Schwarz Blue Commotion The Rainbreakers and the winner of the Jessica Foxley Unsigned to be decided at the 2017 Great British Rhythm & Blues Festival at Colne. Buy Your ticket here and be part of a great night HERE.

Rainbreakers Talks About 2017 UK Blues Challenge

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

 

 

BD: Firstly, thank you for taking the time out to chat with Bluesdoodles today; July 4th.  I was delighted to have had the opportunity via Mascot to review your latest album Live at LaFayette; it is ninety-three minutes of music heaven, smooth, warm and spiced up with clever licks and breaks to keep the listening ear totally engaged.

SL: Great, I love hearing that we try to plan some of these things out, but other things we have no control over and just hope it all pans out when playing live.

BD: What were your first musical influences growing up in Louisiana?
SL: In Louisiana I was already into music, my elder brother Steve was always bringing music in to the house. Elvis Presley was a big thing in Mississippi when I was still living there. Then I discovered Scotty Moore. By the time we got here, there was always music in the area as it is such a big part of the culture here with the Cajun and Creole influences. There were shows on the weekend, on TV and live bands playing, bands would play at the openings for a store you name it a flatbed truck would have a band playing on there, that was in the area and it was great to have that. Walking down town on my first Mardi Gras locally and I sneaked into a bar because I was mesmerized by the sound on the jukebox it was Ray Charles. It was great my family would go back to New Orleans that was the first time I heard Jazz, Rn’B and second line rhythms and so forth. So between all the influences of the music I liked I became a big fan of Chet Atkins, The Jazz Cats and Wes Montgomery. I started out on the trumpet so I had all those jazz heroes like Miles Davies, Ornette Coleman and so forth. So by time I got into the blues which is more of a guitar thing I was thirteen and the list goes on and on… (laughing)

 BD: So what Made you change from the Trumpet to the guitar?

SL:  Well I actually kept up the trumpet at school from 10 years old, fifth grade up until my two years in college and twenty. By the time I started to play guitar the Beatles came along and everybody wanted to have a band. If Scotty Moore fired me up to learn how to play a guitar it was The Beatles that fired me up to play in a band, as did my best friend Tommy, he wanted to play drums and that was our first band he and I, guitar and drums, lot simpler back then! You know with the guitar learning Beatles songs, really for us it was the instrumental thing that worked up some of those songs, played our first gig, we were hooked. A little later I was working in a family operated music store Prof Erny – that was a great experience. He supplied the music, sheet music, instruments for all the band directors in the area.  They sold records, they had a guitar room, so I was lost in there most of the time. There was an older kid there who said man you have to listen to Chet Atkins. Well I heard of him so he sat down and started playing Chet songs it just blew my mind. He started to teach me finger style, so I had to practice that to get the right hand finger picking style of Chet. That was my entry in to the world of solo guitar meaning playing the melody, rhythm and bass lines all at the same time and think of the guitar as a solo instrument. By the time I started listening to the Delta Blues and getting into the blues that’s how I related to the finger picking of all the old blues cats. Started tackling the Slide, I had Chet’s Right Hand technique and slide on little finger of my left hand that started me on my path really.

BD: That all sounds really clever to me!

SL: Well sure shows how clever I was. I was young so into it, so enthusiastic, didn’t have any hang-ups, preconceptions or perceived notions. My worlds view is about figuring out the next chord.  Not a bad place to be, you don’t have prejudiced perception. So your view of reality has not been so imposed on, that you are not open to any and all ideas. I think that was one of the great things about being raised here in South Louisiana because music is such a part of the culture I was open to everything and all those influences.

BD: Yes lots people get closed into a style or approach very early one.

SL Yes they do, I think having played a wind instrument to start off with I came to the guitar with a different perspective, more like a horn player. Where you have to take a breath that affected my phrasing. I guess what I was trying to accomplish on the guitar was different from my contemporaries. They were coming more rock n’ Roll cranking it up to 10 and fire away nothing wrong with that I love it. It helped me in addition to that to think of it in a different way more dynamically. Also that is where the slide comes in because of its vocal quality. I didn’t realise it at the time, but many years later I recognise that my jazz and blues heroes were all striving to emulate the human voice so slide really leads itself to that because of its lyrical quality.

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny LandrethBD: Live at LaFayette is a long awaited live album. How did you decide which tracks to include from the three nights and the decision to have a mix of Acoustic & Electric and as a double album.

SL: That was one of the advantages of doing it here at home. Everything came together my engineer’s studio just few blocks away as a resource for equipment, had him there and musicians in the main are all close by. There is a real nice theatre that has been built since my last live album I did eleven years ago. It was perfect setting for this kind of thing for a multi-night stance. We went in on the Monday set up, sound checked rehearsed with my trio Steve Conn and Sam Broussard. We recorded three nights in a row, that way you can relax more, you have more than one go at it. The hardest thing about recording live is not to think about it, not worry about it, get into the moment just like you do at any other gig that is what you have to capture. So in order to decide which songs that was a little bit of a trip.  Some songs were real obvious, some of the instrumentals I wanted to get those down just like we play night after night with my trio. Then I knew I wanted Steve and Sam to expand some of the other songs that we had been playing like for example Back To Bayou Teche and Walkin Blues I knew they would wail on those, have more colour more texture creating a big sound. Acoustic is where it got really interesting I started to think well, some of these songs that had been electric all along and had bigger production in the studio like probably any songwriter would tell you. Some of those songs  started out with me just on an acoustic guitar coming up with ideas, melodic line, set of changes that led to an idea for a lick, then led to a line lyric line of song becomes a chorus. Takes a while! That is what the whole process revolves around just you on an acoustic guitar. Went back to that just to embrace the essence build on it somewhat with an ensemble it was fun cos then you are re-interpreting songs that had a bigger production on the albums. I have always felt a good song can be interpreted in a number of ways like Creole Angel and Bound By The Blues actually speak better as an acoustic setting.  Because there are so many lyrics they go by so quickly and I think the audience gets engaged more. There are some element of dynamics as well, we figured out the best first come out and do an acoustic set, take a break and then come back out and ramp it up. That is how we approached the recording as well, then I realised we had enough material to do a whole disc acoustic and another electric. We kept adding a song each night that is how it came about. I wish I could say I masterminded the whole thing from day one, had it all planned out. I always wanted to leave something to chance anyway cos that is where some of the more interesting stuff happens, but in terms developing into the concept of a double album it was kinda cool how that came about.

BD: If planned too much it can become too produced too sterile?

SL: Yes, it does nothing wrong with that if that is your thing.  That is what I love about the studio a lot of that is like a painting where you have a canvas and you are adding colours then you get up one morning and you go that looks really good here or embellish it here and that is great. The thing about a live performance the energy with audience and the performers it becomes actually something else more personal connection that way. It certainly propels us to play better there is no doubt about it I can’t really do that in the studio up to a point. To be honest our last album Bound By The Blues was pretty much live in the studio with my trio and so we had lot of that feel about it. But when I have an audience it just takes it to another level and that is what you want to capture with a live album. And the other thing was in that setting and have it be somewhat of a retrospective of different songs over my career which I felt took it to the next level as well more of a personal statement. Something I felt the long-time fans would appreciate the different interpretations you know and then  for newcomers be a good introduction. BD: And they will then go and explore your other albums! SD: I mean it was kinda like your life flashing before your eyes. To be honest it was a nice affirmation to have too many songs to chose from. I would far rather have that than like only have three albums for forty-six years on the road that would be little disappointing. That was fun for me I enjoyed that aspect of it.

BD: Tell our readers about your infectious sound delta blues and zydeco influences? And for people especially in UK what is it about zydeco, creole sound that you create, separating your sound from pure Delta?

SL: Two different things in that regard, there is common thread and that is the Blues.Zydeco music Creole much influence of their African roots, original tribes, sound, rhythms and syncopations in particular and that is the biggest difference between that and Cajun music. Cajun music is the descendants of Nova Scotia and the Great North up there who were deported and settled in this area and a lot of them grew up side-by-side with Creoles so there was a give and take, that is really beautiful there which is why the music is so rich and diverse. Delta Blues across the Mississippi River there is a thread if you listen to say Mississippi John Hurt, playing his acoustic guitar and singing basically telling a story, call them story songs. Then if you were to hear Clifton Chenier playing Blues always in his repertoire, he mixed up blues with everything else and he formulated the sound, the great pinnacle to Zydeco sound there was that element to it. Zydeco per se is real upbeat, syncopated and really the best of it Clifton on his accordion, his drummer Big Robert and his brother Cleveland on the rub board. The three of them would just get of the stage a played old style Zyedeco, I just loved it, you just can’t not move when you hear that music, it is good for the soul.

BD: What are the Blues or how do you define the Blues the perennial debate?

SL: For me main thing about the blues if you take an overview it is such a profound experience again speaking culturally again. It is Grace in the face of adversity. Lot of the kids coming up they learn the licks try and get across to them they need to study the history of the players and the time they lived and what they were going through. It is the back story that is so important and all of them that as a common denominator overcoming challenges. That is why Blues is a universal language, it is something people all over the world relate to. It is these challenges really the things that unite us, I think that is why it resonates with people everywhere. It will always be pertinent, always evolve, will have new players. A lot of the old guard we have lost; not many left at all. That is probably true of all folk music or music that is important of the people. When I say folk music I literally mean music comes from people and their lives, big part of history there that’s when you factor that into story songs it becomes a richer experience that to me is profound.

BD: For me it was your opening phrase Grace in the face of adversity is just brilliant.

SL:  Part of it is all the trials and tribulations and my God! The things that people went through was just horrific and beyond belief. But they would turn to music and they would express, there would be a release in that expression that joy in the moment a thing to have, there is something about that connection that does make it so profound. It is not just another fad or pop song sells in the moment but doesn’t equate to the test of time and that is the big difference. Great music to me is music that stands the test of time.

BD:  Your bottleneck/slide guitar style is so full of power what makes your playing stand out from the crowd and your distinctive sound many describe you as King of Slydeco?

SL: I think what happened to me looking back I am so comfortable is so many different genres of music because of growing up here and that is great, versatility is a good thing. It is possible to go in too many directions at once I think when I landed on and beginning to work with the slide and started to make my way with it I realised it was a way to crystallise all these influences into a unified sound that was my own. Very much included songwriting as well and that became my focus. The fact that I started out on another instrument, influenced by all the other instruments in the area, accordion, rub board, triangle everything because slide offers a greater potential for creating sounds, I picked up on that pretty early and would begin to try and emulate some of these other instruments so I think that is part of it. I definitely made some discoveries that opened the window in terms of possibilities, harmonically, percussively, lyrically I could accomplish all that it was a bigger layer of sound from one instrument so to speak. All those influences come to bear you hope some like cosmic dust rubs off on you. As I got more opportunities to work with people, I always paid attention to how they worked and it has to be your passion.

 BD: If you were putting together the perfect fantasy band with members from across the years (dead or alive) who would you have playing
SL: I would probably but my heroes together, I could watch them play just sit on the side of the stage

Accordion: Clifton Chenier

Drums: Big Robert, just primitive style never heard anything like him.

Bass:  Noel Redding

Guitar: BB Guitar, Jimi Hendrix

I met Jimi Hendrix in store in Baton Rouge he had run away from his road manager and I talked to him . I heard BB; Jimi and Clifton play for the first time within a year when I was 16/17 years old. I have also  met them all, takes us back to your first question that was incredible experience set the bar so high not a bad way to start out

 

BD: Are you planning to come to the UK.

SL: We are Yes, hopefully in the fall if not certainly 2018. 

 

BD: Thank you for taking time out on 4th July

 

Note from editor: Check out his music over at Sonny Landreth

 

Bluesdoodles In Conversation with Sonny Landreth

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album Confessions

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album Confessions

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album Confessions

Pre-order the album now – Dan Reed Store

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album ConfessionsDan Reed’s fourth solo album ‘Confessions’ will be available for worldwide pre-order through the Dan Reed Store from Wednesday 5th July, before it is officially released on Friday 15th September.

The new album will coincide with Dan’s intimate solo tour in beautiful settings which kicks off at London’s St. Pancras Old Church on Thursday 14th September. Tickets for Dan’s solo tour can be booked from ticketsource 

Each of the UK solo concerts will be filmed and recorded for an upcoming live DVD compilation the good new is that everyone who has bought a ticket  in the UK will receive a free DVD download in September. Bad news two of the venues are already SOLD OUT. So get the last remaining tickets TODAY! over at Ticketsource

The official music video for first single Smile will be premiered on Monday 14th August. A limited edition run of 100 signed copies of the single ‘Smile’ on 7” cream coloured vinyl is now available for pre-order before it is officially released on Friday 1st September. The single includes a second track ‘Lift You Up’ on the B-Side. Pre-order the single from the Dan Reed Store.

Confessions is Dan Reed’s fourth solo album and is a bit of a departure from previous solo releases. Reed performed all the live instruments and vocals, and also programmed the beats and synth parts.

The album features special guest appearances by guitarists Rob Daiker, Geoff Tyson and Martin Tidmarsh performing a few solos on the tracks Smile and The Great Divide, while Daiker added some additional drum programming on and mixed the album.

For Confessions, Dan wanted to create a genuine ‘solo’ album to push his own comfort zone as a keyboardist and guitarist’, creating something entirely from self-expression.

Confessions is a beautifully composed work expressing a singular intention and vision based around one integral concept in our lives. Confessions is not a rock album but rather a chilled out, electro/acoustic soul album about the oldest theme in the book… love.

There is a reason for this direction both thematically and musically. Since the reformation of the Dan Reed Network, and with their current album Fight Another Day ,released to rave reviews in 2016 including Bluesdoodles read what we said here, Reed is guiding his solo work more in the pop/soul direction and leaving the harder edged rock/funk material he enjoys writing for future DRN releases.

 

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album Confessions

DAN REED – ‘CONFESSIONS’ – SOLO  TOUR

BOOK ONLINE – www.ticketsource.co.uk

 UPCOMING “CONFESSIONS” TOUR DATES

Book Tickets Online: www.ticketsource.co.uk

Thursday September 14 – London, England – St. Pancras Old Church
‘Confessions UK Tour’ – Filming and Recording for DVD

Friday September 15 – Manchester, England – ‘Sacred Trinity Church Salford’ –
‘Confessions UK Tour’ – Filming and Recording for DVD (SOLD OUT)

Saturday September 16 Newcastle, England – ‘ Cluny 2
‘Confessions UK Tour’ – Filming and Recording for DVD

Sunday September 17 – Nottinghamshire, England – ‘Greyhound Beeston
End of ‘Confessions UK Tour’ Party (SOLD OUT)

Friday September 22 – Helsingborg, Sweden – ‘The Tivoli’ – Dan Reed Trio

Saturday September 23 – Trollhattan, Sweden – ‘Backstage Rock Bar’
Dan Reed Trio

Friday October 6 – Bath, England – ‘Chapel Arts Centre’

Saturday October 7 – Ebbw Vale, Wales UK – ‘EVI’

Friday October 13 – Falun, Sweden – ‘Kopparhatten’

Sunday October 14 – Alingsas, Sweden – ‘MX Rock Bar’

Friday October 20 – Dublin, Ireland – ‘Whelan’s’

Saturday October 21 – Ahoghill/Belfast – ‘Diamond Rock Club’

Saturday November 11 – Trubbach, Switzerland – ‘Jonny’s Lion Cave’

Dan Reed Announces New Solo Album Confessions